buried things

museum-things,
Ojibwe-things,
art-things,
written-things,
object-things

bobbycaputo:

MRI Scans Of Fruits And Veggies Are Astounding And Mildly Frightening

MRI technologist Andy Ellison spends his days scanning human brains, searching for abnormalities. He began scanning fruit on a whim, using an orange in a test of the machine’s settings; the results were so stunningly beautiful and transfixing that he began bringing produce to work, scanning our favorite fruits and veggies on his time off, and posting animated sequences of cross-section images onto his blog, Inside Insides.

(Continue Reading)

(via avamath)

jtotheizzoe:

infinity-imagined:

MRI scans of a Human brain.

Slices of life

(via raymondboisjoly)

hollyoakhill:

do you ever think about how little Michelangelo cared

hollyoakhill:

do you ever think about how little Michelangelo cared

(via baapi-makwa)

ijiphotography:

claudia X revolutionaries of mexico

claudia, a single mother of emiliano (the baby in the belly named after emiliano zapata, the famous mexican revolutionary), is a political organizer, badass mother and a worker working for the revolution of our people.

our collaboration is a tribute to the fallen revolutionaries of and the resistance in mexico <3

(via mujeristaxicana)

allthecanadianpolitics:

Saganash makes emotional appeal for inquiry

Text of speech via Yahoo Canada:

"Indigenous women experience more violence because they are indigenous and because they are women. Amnesty International found that indigenous women are most likely/ to die before non-indigenous women in this country, and are more likely to die violently.

In many indigenous cultures and societies, we are taught to honour women as life-givers, as knowledge-keepers, as storytellers, as medicine women, as word-carriers, as community members and human beings, and colonialism has impacted negatively on those values.

The violence that is perpetrated against indigenous women is the violence against the environment today, and the same violence that assaulted parents and grandparents in residential schools.

Let me quote from the Supreme Court of Canada in the case of R. v. Laliberte. The court said:

'Courts must take judicial notice of such matters as the history of colonialism, displacement, and residential schools and how that history continues to translate into lower educational attainment, lower incomes, higher unemployment, higher rates of substance abuse and suicide….'

Yet, the prime minister, not too long ago, incredulously said we have ‘….no history of colonialism in this country.’

Let me tell a story about a little boy named Jonish, who was sent to a residential school in 1954. He was five years old. He never came back. Apparently, he died the first year he arrived at the residential school.

His mom never knew, until after two years, of his death. His mom, my mom, for 40 years never knew where Jonish was buried. It is only by coincidence, one day, that one of my sisters happened to be in the area, and someone told her “I know where your little brother is buried.”

After 40 years, my sister filmed the site where he was buried and brought the film back to my mom to show her. Just imagine, it was 40 years until she found out where my little brother laid.

I do not know if any of the members have seen their mother cry, but I saw my mother cry many times, but the day she saw that video — I had never seen her cry that way. That was closure. That is what we call closure. That is the closest she could get to final closure for her son.

This is what indigenous families in this country need. That is what they want. That is why they are calling for this national inquiry.

Where is the Canada we used to know, the one that has a history of upholding high standards of human rights and social democratic values in this country? Even when faced with fundamental legislative changes and challenges to the social structure, we used to have that Canada. It is no longer here.

Therefore, I submit very respectfully, that an inquiry would fall into the legacy that this country has. That is why the NDP is calling for that inquiry and that is why the NDP, together with other families and Canadians across this country, want that inquiry.

I stand here today on behalf of the families of the missing and murdered indigenous women so that we can heed their calls for a national inquiry. It is their time. Give them their time so that they can get close to the closure that they also need.

That is why our party will call for that inquiry no longer than 100 days after our election as a government. We will provide the justice that we all need.”

(via reclaimingthenativetag)

We were grabbing a bite of lunch at a small cafe, in a mall, right across from a booth that sold jewelry and where ears could be pierced for a fee. A mother approaches with a little girl of six or seven years old. The little girl is clearly stating that she doesn’t want her ears pierced, that’s she’s afraid of how much it will hurt, that she doesn’t like earrings much in the first place. Her protests, her clear ‘no’ is simply not heard. The mother and two other women, who work the booth, begin chatting and trying to engage the little girl in picking out a pair of earrings. She has to wear a particular kind when the piercing is first done but she could pick out a fun pair for later.

"I don’t want my ears pierced."

"I don’t want any earrings."

The three adults glance at each other conspiratorially and now the pressure really begins. She will look so nice, all the other girls she knows wear earrings, the pain isn’t bad.

She, the child, sees what’s coming and starts crying. As the adults up the volume so does she, she’s crying and emitting a low wail at the same time. “I DON’T WANT MY EARS PIERCED.”

Her mother leans down and speaks to her, quietly but strongly, the only words we could hear were ‘… embarrassing me.’

We heard, then, two small screams, when the ears were pierced.

Little children learn early and often that ‘no doesn’t mean no.’

Little children learn early that no one will stand with them, even the two old men looking horrified at the events from the cafeteria.

Little girls learn early and often that their will is not their own.

No means no, yeah, right.

Most often, for kids and others without power, ”no means force.”

from "No Means Force" at Dave Hingsburger’s blog.

This is important. It doesn’t just apply to little girls and other children, though it often begins there.

For the marginalized, our “no’s” are discounted as frivolous protests, rebelliousness, or anger issues, or we don’t know what we’re talking about, or we don’t understand what’s happening.

When “no means force” we become afraid to say no.

(via k-pagination)

(via moniquill)

socialjusticekoolaid:

Today in Solidarity: Protesters gather in Oakland against the Urban Shield conference and police militarization

Ever wonder where cities get all their fancy ideas on how to militarize their police force? It’s not just from the Pentagon— it’s conferences like Urban Shield, that highlight the latest in tactical equipment and practices for suppressing the very people you’re sworn to serve. #staywoke #whodoyouprotect #whodoyouserve 

(via baapi-makwa)

fyeahindigenousfashion:

It’s been so awesome to have so many cool and stylish followers, we here at fyeahindigenousfashion want to say thanks for supporting us and indigenous artists by having our first giveaway! Here’s the rules:

  • enter by reblogging this post and following FYIF (if you aren’t already!)
  • entries are accepted until midnight, September 25, 2014 
  • each prize is available individually—there are 6 prizes, so there will be 6 winners total

Our prizes are all authentic and come from indigenous-owned businesses. Because we always strive to celebrate the incredible creative diversity among indigenous peoples, we selected prizes from a wide array of cultures and nations:

  • ngatu knockers, SOSS (Tongan)
  • flower earrings, Cheyenne Noon (Southern Cheyenne)
  • lightning bolt pendant, Urban Native Design Co (Pueblo)
  • necklace, Kristin Gentry (Choctaw)
  • flower earrings, Huichol Arte (Huichol)
  • BearMan earrings, Crystal Worl (Tlingit, Athabascan)

Good luck everyone!! 

(via fyeahindigenousfashion)

tastefullyoffensive:

[gemmacorrell/foureyes]

K but can I actually have this now please

tastefullyoffensive:

[gemmacorrell/foureyes]

K but can I actually have this now please

PSA: FYIF is planning some giveaways!

fyeahindigenousfashion:

We currently are at 4,485 beautiful followers—when we get to 4500, we’ll open up a giveaway featuring a few pieces by some of our favorite indigenous artists! We’re also working on arrangements with a few select artists to get giveaway winners some custom-designed stuff for another giveaway when we reach 5000 followers ;)